Sunday, December 9, 2018

Monday in Washington, December 10, 2018

BRINGING PUBLIC PERSPECTIVES INTO ENERGY PROJECTS. 8:30-10:30am. Sponsor: Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes, ASU. Speaker: Kirk Jalbert, assistant professor, Arizona State University, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, joint appointment with School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering.

BRIDGING THE DATA-POLICY GAP ON COUNTERTERRORISM. 10:30am-12:30pm. Sponsors: US Institute of Peace (USIP); Institute for Economics & Peace (IEP). Speakers: Richmond Blake, Director of Policy and Advocacy, Mercy Corps; Michelle Breslauer, Director, Americas Program, IEP; Leanne Erdberg, Director Countering Violent Extremism, USIP; Elizabeth (Liz) Hume, Vice President, Acting CEO, Alliance for Peacebuilding; Erin Miller, Global Terrorism Database Manager, National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism.

MORAL CASE FOR A FREE ECONOMY. 11:00am-Noon. Sponsor: Heritage. Speakers: Robert Sirico, Reverend, President, Acton Institute; David R. Burton, Senior Fellow, Economic Policy, Heritage.

NEEDED NOW MORE THAN EVER: THE INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT OF 1998. 11:45am-1:30pm. Sponsor: Hudson. Speakers: Samuel Brownback, U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom; Frank R. Wolf, Former U.S. Representative (R-VA) and primary sponsor of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998; Thomas L. Gallagher, President and CEO, Religion News Foundation; Nina Shea, Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Religious Freedom; Hudson Institute and Co-Chair, Working Group on Christians and Religious Pluralism in the Middle East; Kristina Arriaga, Vice Chair, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom; Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute and Distinguished Senior Fellow, Institute for the Study of Religion, Baylor University; Hillel Fradkin, Senior Fellow and Director, Center on Islam, Democracy and the Future of the Muslim World, Hudson Institute and founder and co-editor of Current Trends in Islamist Ideology; Elizabeth Prodromou; Co-chair, Working Group on Christians & Religious Pluralism in the Middle East, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute and Associate Professor, Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts University; Erin Rodewald, Co-author, 20th Anniversary of the International Religious Freedom Act: A Retrospective; Lou Ann Sabatier, Co-Author, 20th Anniversary of the International Religious Freedom Act: A Retrospective.

FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR THE PEACE CORPS. 1:00-2:30pm. Sponsor: CSIS. Speakers: Dr. Jody K. Olsen, Director, Peace Corps; Mark L. Schneider, Former Director, Peace Corps, Senior Adviser, Americas Program, Human Rights Initiative, CSIS.

DIVERSE BOOTS ON THE GROUND: EU AND NATO EFFECTIVENESS. 3:30-5:30pm, Washington, DC. Sponsors: German Marshall Fund (GMF); Women International Security (WIIS); Women in Public Service Project (WPSP), Wilson Center. Speakers: Laura Groenendaal, Europe Program, GMF Brussels; Ellen Haring, Senior Fellow, WIIS, Director Combat Integration Initiative Project; Kathleen Hicks, Senior Vice President, Henry A. Kissinger Chair, and Director of the International Security Program, CSIS; Dr. Gale A. Mattox, Global Fellow, Professor of Political Science, U.S. Naval Academy; Moderator: Gwen K. Young, Director, Women in Public Service Project, Wilson Center.

LANTOS RULE OF LAW LECTURE WITH HAROLD HONGJU KOH. 4:30-6:00pm. Sponsor: SAIS, Johns Hopkins. Speakers: Harold Hongju Koh, Professor of International Law, Yale Law School; Eliot Cohen, Vice Dean for Education and Academic Affairs, Professor of Strategic Studies, SAIS, Johns Hopkins; moderator, Katrina Lantos Swett, President, Lantos Foundation for Human Rights and Justice.

HOW A MISGUIDED FEDERAL RESERVE EXPERIMENT DEEPENED AND PROLONGED THE GREAT RECESSION. 5:00-6:15pm. Sponsor: AEI. Speakers: Paul H. Kupiec, Former Associate Director, Division of Insurance and Research, FDIC, Resident Scholar, AEI; George Selgin, Senior Fellow, Director, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato, Professor of Economics, University of Georgia; David Beckworth, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center, George Mason University; Bill Nelson, Executive Vice President, Chief Economist, Bank Policy Institute.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Fury as Japanese paper redefines 'comfort women'

The Japan Times' decision to revise its description of women forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese military during World War II has triggered anger and condemnation. Julian Ryall reports.

by Julian Ryall, December 5, 2018

Japan's oldest English-language newspaper, The Japan Times, has provoked anger and accusations of historical revisionism after announcing that it will no longer use the term "comfort women" to describe women forced to serve in front-line brothels for the Japanese military during World War II.

The paper also said that it was dropping the phrase "forced laborers" for the hundreds of thousands put to work in often appalling conditions during the conflict.

Read more: 'Comfort women' - The wounds of their lives

On November 30, The Japan Times said in an editor's note attached to a story that the terms "comfort women" and "forced labor" were "potentially misleading."

Claiming that the "conditions [the laborers] worked under" and how they were recruited "varied," the paper said it will from now on refer to them as "wartime laborers."

The definition of "comfort women" has previously been understood to refer to women who were forced to provide sex to Japanese troops before and during World War II, but that is being altered, the paper added.

Rewriting history
"Because the experiences of comfort women in different areas throughout the course of the war varied widely, from today we will refer to 'comfort women' as 'women who worked in wartime brothels, including those who did so against their will, to provide sex to Japanese soldiers.'"

The announcement appeared in the paper at the bottom of a story about the ruling by the South Korean Supreme Court on November 29 that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries should pay compensation to a group of Koreans who had been forced to work in the company's munitions factories and dockyards during the war.

Mindy Kotler, director of Asia Policy Point and an advocate for the rights of former Allied prisoners of war, many of whom were also forced to work in Japanese factories, described the paper's change in editorial policy as "a dramatic capitulation" to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's "PR efforts to rewrite history" and fit his own political agenda.

"This is nothing less than astonishing and outrageous," she said. "This is not a change of wording; it is a change of definition. It is the manipulation of language to bury history."

Read more: Is the Japan-South Korea 'comfort women' deal falling apart?

Kotler charges that a "central theme" of the Abe administration has been to deny Japan's war crimes "as mere manifestations of victor's justice" and his administration has set up committees to undermine the 1993 statement by then Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono apologizing to the comfort women, as well as the outcomes of the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunals.

"The goal is to build an idealized wartime regime," Kotler said. "Ignored is the fact that Japanese fascism had bad personal, national and international consequences."

The Japanese government is likely to try to apply the same term to Allied prisoners of war (POWs) who were put to work, Kotler said, adding, "Mostly it whitewashes the horrors and abuses inflicted upon those who did not willingly work for Japanese industries."

Change in ownership
The change in editorial policy at The Japan Times — founded in 1897 — comes 17 months after it was sold to a Tokyo-based public relations company called News2U Holdings for an undisclosed amount. In a statement issued at the time, the new owner said it would maintain the paper's editorial independence.

But some people believe that the Japan Times is already taking a new editorial line by adopting a position which is closer to the Abe administration, which has been determined to deny Japan's war crimes 'as mere manifestations of victor's justice'.

"The reason this new policy at the newspaper is in error is because when it comes to sex slavery, they try to conflate voluntary prostitution with the women and girls who were abducted and forced to work in these brothels," said a former employee of The Japan Times who wished to remain anonymous.

"It may be that there were some women who were working voluntarily, but the rest of the world is talking about those who were not volunteers," the source said, adding: "To me, this is a disingenuous attempt to whitewash history and, for me, the only people who don't know about Japanese history are the Japanese themselves."

The Japan Times was contacted for a comment for this article but did not reply.

Critics say the Abe administration has been determined to deny Japan's war crimes 'as mere manifestations of victor's justice'

Kotler believes that Tokyo will continue to use diplomatic pressure and money to promote its version of history, such as the removal of a "comfort woman" statue that stood close to the site of the Bayview Hotel in Manila, scene of an alleged mass rape and murders by the Japanese military in the closing days of the war.

"This is not a mere editorial policy of an independent newspaper," she said. "The only response should be loud condemnation. The New York Times should sever its ties with The Japan Times."

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Monday in Washington, December 3, 2018

A CRISIS OF BELIEFS: INVESTOR PSYCHOLOGY AND FINANCIAL FRAGILITY. 12/3, 12:15-1:30pm. Sponsor: Peterson Institute. Speaker: author, Andrei Shleifer, Professor of Economics, Harvard University. Webcast only.

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THE ARTICLE II MANDATE: FORGING A STRONGER ECONOMIC ALLIANCE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND JAPAN. 12/3, 1:00-3:30pm. Sponsor: CSIS. Speakers: Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-TX), Founding co-chair of the U.S.-Japan Caucus and the Congressional Caucus on ASEAN; Matthew P. Goodman; Senior Vice President, Simon Chair in Political Economy, and Senior Adviser for Asian Economics; CSIS; Satu Limaye, Director; East-West Center and Director; Asia Matters for America Initiative; Erin Murphy, Founder and Principal; Inle Advisory Group; Shin Oya, Senior Consulting Fellow; API and Chief Representative for Strategic Research, JBIC; Moderator: Jacob Schlesinger, Senior Asia Economics Correspondent and Central Banks Editor-Asia, Wall Street Journal.


ADVANCING THE NEXT WAVE OF AVIATION INNOVATION. 12/3, 3:00-4:30pm. Sponsor: Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF). Speakers: Greg Bowles, Vice President of Global Innovation & Policy, General Aviation Manufacturers Association; Eli Dourado, Head of Global Policy and Communications, Boom Supersonic; Jay Dryer, Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics Programs, NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate; Jenny Rosenberg, Founder, JTR Strategies.

JAPANESE AND AMERICAN INNOVATION IN A GLOBAL AGE. 12/3, 3:00-7:00pm. Sponsor: Carnegie; Social Science Research Council; Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership. Speakers: Takahiro Ueyama, executive member of the Council for Science, Technology and Innovation, Cabinet Office of Japanese Government; James L. Schoff, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Asia Program; Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Vincent de Paul Professor, director, Global Asian Studies Program, DePaul University; Masaru Yarime, associate professor, Division of Public Policy, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Marie Anchordoguy, professor in the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington; Linda Grove, consulting director for the Tokyo office of the Social Science Research Council, senior adviser to the Abe Global Fellowship program.

ICAS ANNUAL LIBERTY CELEBRATION DINNER. 12/3, 6:30-9:30pm. Sponsor: Institute for Corean-American Studies (ICAS). Speakers include: Amb. Thomas Hubbard, Chairman, Korea Society, Senior Director, McLarty Associates; Sunny K. Park, Chief Executive Janitor, General Building Maintenance, CEO, Global Sun Investments Inc.

PROSPECTS FOR JAPAN-RUSSIA RELATIONS. 12/3, 5:00-6:00pm. Sponsor: Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies, GTU. Speaker: Taisuke Abiru, Senior Representative, Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), Former Research Fellow, Tokyo Foundation. 

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Monday in Washington, October 26, 2018


IMPLEMENTING DEFENSE-INDUSTRIAL POLICY. 11/26, 10:30am-Noon. Sponsor: Atlantic Council. Speakers: Eric Chewning, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Policy; Caralynn Nowinski Collens, CEO, UI Labs; Arun Seraphin, Staff Member, Senate Armed Services Committee, Jeff Wilcox, Vice President for Digital Transformation, Lockheed Martin; Moderator: Steve Grundman, Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council.

AMBASSADOR SERIES: BRITISH AMBASSADOR DISCUSSES THE EVOLVING US-UK RELATIONSHIP. 11/26, Noon-1:00pm. Sponsor: Hudson Institute. Speaker: Sir Kim Darroch, British Ambassador to the US; Moderator: Walter Russell, the Ravenel B. Curry III Distinguished Fellow, Strategy and Statesmanship, Hudson Institute. 

SUPPORTING GLOBAL INTEGRATION: THE JOINT STAFF APPROACH TO AIR AND MISSILE DEFENSE. 11/26, Refreshments, 1:00-3:30pm. Sponsor: CSIS. Speakers: BG Clement Coward, Commander, 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command; BG(P) Sean Gainey, Director, Joint Integrated Air and Missile Defense Organization (JIAMDO); RADM Archer Macy (USN, ret.), Former Director, JIAMDO; Brig Gen Kenneth Todorov (USAF, ret.), Former Director, JIAMDO; Col Richard Glitz (USAF, ret.), Former Technical Director, JIAMDO; Thomas Karako, Senior Fellow, International Security Program, Director, Missile Defense Project, CSIS; Archer Macy, Non-resident Senior Associate, Missile Defense Project, CSIS. 

SINO-INDIAN RELATIONS: TENSIONS IN ASIA. 11/26, 3:00-4:30pm. Sponsor: Hudson Institute. Speaker: Dr. Manoj Joshi, journalist; Moderator: Dr. Aparna Pande, Research Fellow, Director, Future of India and South Asia, Hudson Institute. 

JERUSALEM AND WASHINGTON: A LIFE IN POLITICS AND DIPLOMACY. 11/26, 5:00-6:30pm. Sponsor: CSIS. Speakers: Author, Zalman Shoval, Former Israeli Ambassador to the US; H. Andrew Schwartz, Chief Communication Officer, CSIS.

Friday, November 9, 2018

New Cabinet State Ministers and Affiliations


Vice Ministers
On October 2, 2018, Japanese Prime Minster Shinzo Abe reshuffled his Cabinet. Of the 25 State Ministers in his Fifth Cabinet, six (24%) were reappointed from the previous Cabinet and 19 (76%) are new. Tsukasa AKIMOTO previously a State Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, was re-appointed as the State Minister of the Environment. 

Most the State Ministers are conservative nationalists. The usual metric is memberships or affiliations with various Diet Leagues, especially the Diet Members’ League for the Shinto Association of Spiritual Leadership [Shinto League] (also can be translated as Shinto Political Alliance Diet Member’s Roundtable; 神道政治連盟国会議員懇談会-Shintou seiji renmei kokkai giin kondankai) and the Diet Members’ Gathering (League) for the Japan Conference, [Nippon Kaigi] (also can be translated as Diet Representative ‘Japan Conference’ Roundtable;日本会議国会議員懇談会- Nippon kaigi kokkai giin kondankai)

Both organizations advocate revising the constitution to return Shinto as the state religion and the Emperor to political power. They oppose the current Constitution support of individual rights, women's rights, and freedom of speech. They advocate a moral education and respect for Japan's past, while rejecting any Japanese involvement in war crimes.

Nineteen (76%) State Ministers are members of the Shinto League, while sixteen (64%) are affiliated with Nippon Kaigi. 

Four State Ministers are members of neither League. Emiko TAKAGAI, State Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare is the only LDP member affiliated with neither.

The other three are from the Komeito Party: Masayoshi HAMADA, State Minister for Reconstruction; Tomoko UKISHIMA, State Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology; Yoshinori OGUCHI, State Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare. Komeito Party is associated with the Buddhist religious group, Sokka Gakkai. The party has been a coalition partner with the LDP since 1999. There is one member of the U.S. Congress who is a Sokka Gakkai member. 

October 18th was the Autumn Festival at Yasukuni Shrine. Although all the Cabinet Ministers refrained from visiting, we determined from public postings that eight State Ministers (32%) visited. Yasukuni is a Shinto Shrine (a form of animism) located in central Tokyo established in 1869 to anchor the new, modernizing Japanese state to a religion and an ideology. It “militarized” the religion. This Shrine is associated with the discredited “state Shinto” created to justify the Emperor-centric, military state. Many war criminals are enshrined there. Thus, visiting the Shrine is a controversial for politicians and bureaucrats. 

Although Abe appointed only two female State Ministers in his previous Cabinet, this time he increased the number to five female State Ministers (20%): Yukari SATO, State Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications; Toshiko ABE, State Minister for Foreign Affairs; Emiko TAKAGAI, State Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare; Yoshihiko ISOZAKI, State Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry.

★ New cabinet member
❇︎ Position as State Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism in Abe’s 4th Cabinet

Position First Name Last Name Shinto League Nippon Kaigi Yasukuni Visit (10/18)
State Minister for Reconstruction Keiichiro TACHIBANA★
State Minister for Reconstruction Masayoshi HAMADA
State Minister of Cabinet Office Akira SATO★
State Minister of Cabinet Office Ryosei TANAKA
State Minister of Cabinet Office Kazuyuki NAKANE
State Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications Junji SUZUKI★
State Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications; State Minister of Cabinet Office Yukari SATO★
State Minister of Justice Hiroshi HIRAGUCHI★
State Minister for Foreign Affairs Toshiko ABE★
State Minister for Foreign Affairs Masahisa SATO
State Minister of Finance Kenichiro UENO
State Minister of Finance Keisuke SUZUKI★
State Minister of education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Keiko NAGAOKA★
State Minister of education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology; State Minister of Cabinet Office Tomoko UKISHIMA★
State Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare Yoshinori OGUCHI★
State Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare Emiko TAKAGAI★
State Minister of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Yasuhiro OZATO★
State Minister of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Shuichi TAKATORI★
State Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Yoshihiro SEKI★

State Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry;
State Minister of Cabinet Office
Yoshihiko ISOZAKI★

State Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Takashi OTSUKA★

State Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism; State Minister of Cabinet Office; State Minister for Reconstruction Ichiro TSUKADA★

State Minister of the Environment Minoru KIUCHI★

State Minister of the Environment; State Minister of Cabinet Office Tsukasa AKIMOTO❇︎
State Minister of Defense; State Minister of Cabinet Office Kenji HARADA★

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Weekend of Comfort Women Herstory

by Christian Poirot 
This weekend is one for the history of the Comfort Women. There are a number of opportunities, especially in Washington, DC. to discuss and consider the history of the Comfort Women and its unique form of sexual violence in conflict. Most of the events below employ the arts to communicate the universal emotions of the trauma and tragedy.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9

[DC] GEORGETOWN GENDER+JUSTICE INITIATIVE’S THIRD ANNUAL FACULTY RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM. 11/9, 1:00-6:30pm, Washington, DC. Sponsor: Georgetown Gender+Justice Initiative. Speakers include: Deborah Epstein, Professor of Law, GTU Law; Lisa Singh, Professor, Department of Computer Science, GTU; Jamillah Williams, Associate Professor of Law, GTU Law; Naomy Mezey, Professor of Law, GTU Law; Lane Windham, Fellow, Kalmanovitz Initiative; Kris Tiscione, Professor of Law, GTU Law.

[DC] US DEBUT SCREENING OF NEW DOCUMENTARY ON COMFORT WOMEN CONTROVERSY: SHUSENJO. 11/9, 4:00-6:30pm, Washington, DC. Sponsor: History Department, Georgetown University. Speaker: Miki Dezani, filmmaker who says he interviewed some of the most prominent figures in the debate in Japan and Korea.

[DC] SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN WARFARE: THE FILMS OF UNHEALED WOUNDS FILM FESTIVAL. 11/9-11, Washington, DC. Sponsor: Washington Coalition for Comfort Women (WCCW) and American University. Films: Nine international films highlight the history and trauma of the “Comfort Women” (CW). Four of the films are from Korea, two from Australia, and one each from China, Canada, and the Netherlands. The lives of Dutch, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, and Indonesian former Comfort Women are portrayed. At Noon on Sunday, November 11th there will be a roundtable discussion with the directors and experts on “The Art of the Witness” examining the importance of the arts in conveying the history of the CW and in preserving CW voices.
NOVEMBER 9
6:00 - 8:00PM I Can Speak (119 min)
8:00 - 8:30 Director's Talk
8:30 - 10:00 Reception

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10

[DC] SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN WARFARE: THE FILMS OF UNHEALED WOUNDS FILM FESTIVAL [SEE ABOVE]

10:00 - 11:00 50 Years of Silence (57 min)
11:00 - 11:15 Daily Bread (15 min)
11:15 - 11:45 Director's Talk
11:45 - 12:15 Break & Snack
12:15 - 1:15 Because We Were Beautiful (60 min)
1:15 - 1:40 Discussion
1:40 - 2:00 Break & Snack
2:00 - 3:40 Twenty Two (99 min)
3:40 - 4:00 Discussion
4:00 - 5:00 Break & Snack
5:00 - 7:10 Spirits' Homecoming (127 min)
7:10 - 7:50 Cocktail / Refreshment
7:50 - 8:30 Ae-Eum-Gil (100 min)
8:30 - 10:00 Director's Talk

[TOKYO] INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM: VOICES OF THE ‘COMFORT WOMEN’: REMEMBERING & RECONSTRUCTING. 11/10, 10:00am-6:00pm, Tokyo, Japan. Sponsor: International Joint Nomination Committee (ICJN). Speakers: Heisoon Shin, Director, ICJN Secretariat; Ustinia Dolgopol, Associated Professor, Flinders University; Lilian Sing, Co-chair, “Comfort Women” Justice Coalition; Yasushi Higashizawa (Lawyer); Hye-In Han, Team Leader, ICJN Secretariat; Eriko Ikeda, Commissioner, Japanese Committee; Hyun-Gyung Kim, Post-doc researcher, Berlin Free University; Phyllis Kim, Executive Director, Korean American Forum of California; Shu-Mei Huang, Assistant Professor, National Taiwan University; Edward Vickers, Professor, Kyushu University; Hyun-Kyung Lee, Post-doc researcher, University of Cambridge, Seoul National University; Akihisa Matsuno, Professor, Osaka University; Hye-In Han, Team Leader, ICJN Secretariat; Marie Louise Stig Sorensen, Professor, University of Cambridge; Mary McCarthy, Associated Professor, Drake University; Linda Hasunuma, Visiting Professor, University of Bridgeport; Yujie Zhu, Lecturer, Australian National University; Mina Watanabe, Japanese Committee, Director, Women’s Active Museum on War and Peace (WAM); Phyllis Kim, Korean American Forum of California.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

[DC] SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN WARFARE: THE FILMS OF UNHEALED WOUNDS FILM FESTIVAL [SEE ABOVE]


10:00 - 10:15 For Her (14 min)
10:20 - 12:04 The Apology (104 min)
12:04 - 12:30 Director's Talk

12:30-2:00pm - Roundtable Discussion on The Art of the Witness: Film in Persevering the History of the Comfort Women. Directors will discuss their work with history and media scholars. Free. Lite Lunch. Media Innovation Lab, McKinley Bldg., Rm 100.
WITH Ms. Mindy Kotler, Director, Asia Policy Point (Ms. Kotler is a public historian who works on the intersection of history and politics in Northeast Asia. She writes on the progress toward historical justice for the Comfort Women and the American POWs of Japan. In 2007, she assisted Congressman Mike Honda in 2007 in writing and defending his House Resolution 121 that asked Japan for an unequivocal, official apology to the Comfort Women.) and Dr. Greg Metcalf, Lecturer Twentieth-Century Art, Film, Department of Art History and Archaeology, University of Maryland, College Park (Dr. Metcalf teaches Film and Twentieth Century Art for the Department of Art History and Archaeology at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has a B.A. in Art/East Asian Studies/Political Science (St. Olaf), an M.F.A. in Painting and Graphics (Bowling Green) and a Ph.D. in Art and Culture (UMCP).)

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 11TH AND BEYOND
SCREENING AND DISCUSSION OF THE APOLOGY DIRECTED BY TIFFANY HSIUNG.

[PORTLAND, OR] 11/13
, 6:00pm. Sponsor: People Organizing for Philippine Solidarity (POPS)and FeND. Location: US Bank Room, Multnomah Central Library, 801 SW 10th Ave, Portland, Oregon. https://www.facebook.com/events/285638112158553/

Sunday, November 4, 2018

The Ministers of Abe's Fifth Cabinet


On October 2, 2018, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe reshuffled his Cabinet. Of the 19 Cabinet Ministers in his Fifth Cabinet, eight (42.1%) were re-appointed from the previous Cabinet and eleven (57.8%) are new. 

This Cabinet is measurably more conservative than his previous ones. The usual metric is memberships or affiliations with various Diet Leagues, especially the Diet Members’ League for the Shinto Association of Spiritual Leadership [Shinto League] (also can be translated as Shinto Political Alliance Diet Member’s Roundtable; 神道政治連盟国会議員懇談会-Shintou seiji renmei kokkai giin kondankai) and the Diet Members’ Gathering (League) for the Japan Conference, [Nippon Kaigi] (also can be translated as Diet Representative ‘Japan Conference’ Roundtable;日本会議国会議員懇談会- Nippon kaigi kokkai giin kondankai). 

Both organizations advocate revising the constitution to return Shinto as the state religion and the Emperor to political power. They oppose the current Constitution support of individual rights, women's rights, and freedom of speech. They advocate a moral education and respect for Japan's past, while rejecting any Japanese involvement in war crimes.

Only one Minister is a member of neither League: Keiichi ISHII, Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. He is from the Komeito Party that is associated with the Buddhist religious group, Sokka Gakkai. The party has been a coalition partner with the LDP since 1999. There is one member of the U.S. Congress who is a Sokka Gakkai member.

Taro KONO, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Masatoshi ISHIDA, Minister for International Affair and Communications; Yoshiaki HARADA, Minister of the Environment; and Takuya HIRAI, Minister for Information Technology Policy, although members of the Shinto League, are not members of the Nippon Kaigi.

There is only one female minister: Satsuki KATAYAMA, Minister of State for Regional Revitalization. In Abe's previous Cabinet (4th) there were four female ministers and in his 3rd, two.

★ New cabinet member
❇︎ Past affiliation with Shinto League, but not in recent years

Position First Name Last Name Shinto League Nippon Kaigi
Prime Minister Shinzo ABE
Minister of Finance Taro ASO
Minister for Internal Affair and Communications Masatoshi ISHIDA ★
Minister of Justice Takashi YAMASHITA★
Minister for Foreign Affairs Taro KONO
Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Masahiko SHIBAYAMA ★
Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare Takumi NEMOTO ✔ ❇︎
Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Takamori YOSHIKAWA ★
Minister of Economy, Trade, and Industry Hiroshige SEKO
Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Keiichi ISHII
Minister of the Environment Yoshiaki HARADA ★
Minister of Defense Takeshi IWAYA ★
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide SUGA
Minister for Reconstruction Hiromichi WATANABE ★
Chairperson of the National Public Safety Commission Junzo YAMAMOTO ★
Minister for Promoting Dynamic Engagement of All Citizens Mitsuhiro MIYAKOSHI ★
Minister in charge of Information Technology Policy Takuya HIRAI ★
Minister of State for Economic and Fiscal Policy Toshimitsu MOTEGI
Minister of State for Regional Revitalization Satsuki KATAYAMA ★
Minister in charge of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Yoshitaka KATAYAMA ★

Monday in Washington, November 5, 2018

GLOBAL ILLICIT ALCOHOL TRADE. 11/5, Breakfast, 9:00-11:00am. Sponsor: Transnational Alliance to Combat Illicit Trade (TRACIT). Speakers: Jeffrey Hardy, Director-General, Transnational Alliance to Combat Illicit Trade; Monica Ramirez, Global Director, Regulatory & Public Policy, Anheuser-Busch InBev; Juan Ricardo Ortega, Operations Principal Advisor, Inter-American Development Bank; Moderator: Ana Rold, Editor-in-Chief, Diplomatic Courier.

IMITATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS: DEMOCRATIC MALAISE IN POST-COMMUNIST EUROPE. 11/5, Noon-2:00pm. Sponsor: International Forum for Democratic Studies, National Endowment for Democracy. Speaker: Ivan Krastev, Chairman, Centre for Liberal Strategies (Sofia), Permanent Fellow, Institute for Human Sciences (Vienna); Moderator: Marc F. Plattner, Journal of Democracy

BEYOND LIBERAL ORDER: STATES, SOCIETIES AND MARKETS IN THE GLOBAL INDIAN OCEAN. 11/5, 12:30-1:30pm. Sponsor: Walsh School of Foreign Service, GTU. Speakers: Dr. Harry Verhoeven, Professor, School of Foreign Service in Qatar, GTU.

DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN: LEADERSHIP IN TURBULENT TIMES. 11/5, Lunch, 12:30pm. Sponsor: National Press Club. Speaker: Doris Kearns Goodwin, author.

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IN SEARCH OF EVIDENCE-BASED SCIENCE POLICY. 11/5, 1:00-2:00pm. Sponsor: Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, GW. Speakers: Author, Dr. Albert H. Teich, Research Professor of Science, Technology, and International Affairs, Elliot School, GW; Dr. Jeff Alexander, Senior Manager of Innovation Policy, Research Triangle Institute (RTI).

VALEDICTORY REMARKS & RECEPTION WITH NEW ZEALAND AMBASSADOR TIM GROSER. 11/5, 4:00-6:00pm, Washington, DC. Sponsor: Washington International Trade Assn. Speaker: Amb. Tim Groser, New Zealand. fee.
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INVISIBLE SLAVES: THE VICTIMS AND PERPETRATORS OF MODERN SLAVERY. 11/5, 4:30-5:30pm. Sponsor: Institute of World Politics (IWP). Speaker: Author, W. Kurt Hauser.

INVESTING GLOBALLY IN PEACE, SECURITY, AND STABILITY. 11/5, 6:00-8:00pm. Sponsor: Women’s Foreign Policy Group (WFPG). Speaker: H.E. Kåre R. Aas, Ambassador of Norway to the US, Former Political Director of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway.



Friday, November 2, 2018

Remembering Wartime Slave Labor

Nazi slavery recalled at UNESCO-listed Völklinger Ironworks



Deutsche Welle
October 31, 2018

Grenades, aircraft parts and military equipment created in one of Nazi Germany’s largest steel and ironworks were the product of forced laborers. An installation by French artist Christian Boltanski remembers them. Voices whisper their names from all corners of the vast former iron foundry: women, men and children from 20 countries who were transported from across Nazi-occupied Europe and forced to work under inhumane conditions — and ultimately die — at the Völklinger Ironworks.


The French artist Christian Boltanski, in his installations "Forced Laborers" and "Memories," which are on display from November 1 at the site, reminds us of the 12,396 people taken from countries from Albania to Belgium, Bulgaria to France, from Denmark, Serbia, the Ukraine and nearly everywhere in between, to work as slaves as part of the Nazi arms build-up.

The installation employs the actual spoken recollections of former ironworkers, which are emitted from the numbered lockers that form the focal point for the work. Here long-suppressed memories come to life.

Christian Boltanski




➽  CLICK HERE FOR A PDF OF THE EXHIBITION CATALOG. It lists all the names of the forced laborers. This is the English version.




Worked to death

Set in the 19th century German industrial landmark, the installation also features a pile of anonymous black trousers and jackets on the floor surrounded by stacked archive boxes. The light is sparse. Here the visitor understands why, during World War II, forced laborers who were transported to Völklingen near the French border were deprived of their ID cards and made to wear a special badge. A circular forbid staff in the plant from being friendly with the prisoners: "The enemy remains the enemy," it read.

Hermann Röchling was then the head of the iron foundry and a fervent admirer of Adolf Hitler. He was a member of the senior staff of the Nazi department for the "war economy," and thus responsible for the entire armaments industry and the widespread use of imported slave labor. The deaths of 261 forced laborers, including 60 children and infants, occurred under his watch. Some of them did not see their first birthday.


Read more: South Korea court orders Japan's Nippon Steel to compensate forced laborers
      NB: A number of the Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Steel sites in Japan have become, like the Völklinger Ironworks, UNESCO World Industrial Heritage Sites. These sites used Korean forced labor as well as Chinese (there was a policy of abduction toward the end of the war) slave labor and Allied and American POW slave labor. There is NO acknowledgment of this. 

Boltanski, a conceptual artist, painter, sculptor and filmmaker who is a regular at the Documenta art exhibition in Kassel and in 2011 designed the French pavilion of the 54th Biennale in Venice, creates an emotive outlet to understand this dark chapter in the history of the steel plant.

A history of slavery

The Völklinger Ironworks was once the largest manufacturer of iron girders in Germany following its foundation in 1873. It was already producing war equipment during World War I, including 90 percent of the crude steel used to build German army helmets. Forced laborers from Belgium and Italy — in addition to prisoners-of-war from France and Russia — were also employed in the steel factory at the time. Around 10 percent of these slave workers died on site; these victims are also remembered in Boltanski's installation.

"Industrial culture in all European countries was no innocent culture," said general manager and managing director of the Völklinger Hütte, Meinrad Maria Grewenig, at the opening of the installation.

The postwar period was less controversial, with the ironworks booming in the 1960s and employing some 17,000 people before a worldwide steel crisis hit the in the mid-1970s. By 1986, the chimneys in Völklingen had stopped smoking.

In 1994, UNESCO declared the Völklinger Ironworks a World Heritage Site, the first industrial monument to be placed on the prestigious list. But while the site is the only surviving factory from the heyday of iron and steel production in 19th century Germany, the Völklinger Ironworks has a more sinister heritage upon which Christian Boltanski is again shining light.

The Christian Boltanski installation will be on display at the Völklinger Ironworks from November 1 through August 31, 2019.